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Suicide

Don’t do it.

There’s a better solution, than taking your own life.

Once in a while suicide may seem like the easiest solution to your problems. When everything seems bleak, unwelcoming and disheartening, it may seem like the easiest way to obtain peace and tranquility and alleviate the negative forces at work, but in almost every case, suicide is the coward’s way out. It’s the optimal solution for people who aren’t strong enough to overcome their obstacles, or who aren’t smart enough to think of a better way.

You can be better than that.

Of all the options available to a person in life’s myriad of possibilities, it’s unlikely that sacrificing your life would be the optimum path to follow.

Though some might argue that honor, making a positive impact on the world, or simple happiness are your most important possessions, few would argue that your life isn’t one of your most valuable, if not the most valuable possession you will ever have.  Don’t throw it away recklessly.

No matter how bad things seem now, one of the great and amazing things about life is that everything can turn around in the blink of an eye and no matter how low you are at this moment, tomorrow presents a whole new day, just right for a positive new attitude, newfound happiness and exciting new possibilities.

Life, by its very nature, is an evolutionary process. It’s always changing, constantly evolving. We’re all going to die anyway. Why rush the process, when there are so many possibilities and new things to experience?

So many people only see the options right in front of them. They don’t realize that they could be living in another country in a matter of a few hours, or quit their job and start a completely new profession in two or three days. Though it may seem you’re stuck, with no where to go, there are no boxes in the real world that can hold you. Even if you are stuck in a jail cell, your mind can always wander. Don’t delude yourself into believing otherwise, you have plenty of options and the only thing keeping you truly confined is you.

Whatever negative forces are at work on you now, fight through them, take charge, and get help. Weather this storm and sure, there are bound to be others, but there will also be unspeakable moments of beauty, pleasure and happiness. Don’t throw the baby out with the bath water.

This is one of the great miracles of life.  We never know what’s around the next corner. Life is the greatest adventure of all and if you cut it short, it’s like stopping a movie in the middle. Sometimes movies start off slow, but the payoff at the end is worth the wait. Often, when you’re patient and you endure, you’ll be rewarded in the end.

Some religious folks claim it’s immoral to take your own life under any circumstances and call it a sin, saying that you’ll go to hell for squandering God’s most precious gift.

People may debate whether there’s a God, or a hell until the ends of time, but one thing that should not be debated is the morality of taking ones own life.

The truth is, most suicides do not leave a good reflection on the perpetrator, because they have given up, quit, surrendered and conceded. Such acquiescence is generally frowned upon by the many tiers of society and rightfully so.

However, is “suicide” itself inherently immoral?

No.

There may be times when suicide is a rational choice, when it’s moral, brave, and even heroic.

To judge suicide correctly one must take it in context. 

For example, a man who throws himself on a grenade to protect his comrades is committing suicide, but it’s not in an immoral way. His self-sacrifice is brave, heroic and moral. Now, some would argue, he shouldn’t dive on the grenade and everyone should take their chances, but the point is, you can’t condemn the man for such a noble death.

Or consider a man whose family is set upon by killers. He tells them to run, while he stays and fights, even though he knows the odds are stacked too far against him and he will die. He sacrifices his life for his family and to do the right thing. That’s not wrong, nor is it immoral.

Perhaps a soldier, fighting for a noble cause, is taken prisoner. He may know that he will be tortured mercilessly for months or years, with little or no hope of rescue. The torture may be essentially unbearable and it is conceivable that he is better off taking his own life, than sustaining the tremendous amount of suffering that is almost assured to come.  Even in this example, there’s a very off chance that the soldier could be rescued or find a way to escape, so he still might have better options. Also, he could attack his captors and allow them to kill him, thus a certain sense of revenge and retribution and dying without concession or any appearance of surrender.

People with horribly painful deteriorative diseases might also be considered morally justified suicides. Though there are some “miracle” recoveries from “incurable” diseases and the like, sometimes the afflicted might be permissibly justified for instigating their own escape from what may be an inescapable or nearly inescapable situation.

Perhaps a senior citizen with Alzheimer’s, who is slowly losing their mind, their ability to be self-sufficient and productive might look at themselves and consider the toll they’re taking on the time, energy and financial resources of their loved ones. If they can no longer give back sufficiently and don’t want to be a burden, taking one’s own life to the benefit of one’s loved ones could be a very noble way to go. That old wise one could leave their family with a memory of their love, bravery and wisdom, instead of years of needless suffering, burdensome pressure and hundreds of thousands of dollars of financial debt.

But note that all of these “justified” examples of suicide are conceived in the most extreme situations. None of them are along the lines of “I’m lonely and I just want to end it,” or “my family life sucks and things seem like they’re never going to get better!”

There are better ways. Even in the most extreme and dire of situations there are usually better ways.

It’s likely that almost everyone contemplates suicide in general terms at one time or another in their life, but if you feel you’re ready to take steps toward ending your life, you should contact a suicide hotline, talk to a psychiatrist, or at the very least, discuss what you’re going through with friends and family.

Logical Spiritualism’s sections on “10 Reasons Not to Commit Suicide,”“10 Ways to Overcome Depression,” “Depression,” “120 Ways to Improve Your Life” and “30 Ways to be Happy” might all be helpful reads as well.

Remember life has rough and horrible times, but it’s like life’s seasons. The winter is obtrusive, freezing and frigid, but the summer will come again, with its perfect beautiful days and we’ll be able to appreciate all the more, because we’ve experienced the alternative.

Cherish the good and the bad, because without one, the other is diminished.

Just as the worst storms come with flashes of light, thunderclap explosions and torrents of rain, they’re usually gone in a day. Things will be nice again. Hold on.

Things always change. Things get better, if you hold on. 

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